Why innovation policy must be innovative

About a year ago I came across the work of the historian and archaeologist Ian Morris, who observed that “change is caused by lazy, greedy, frightened people looking for easier, more profitable, and safer ways of doing things”. This Morris Theorem essentially presents human sloth, greed, and fear as the key drivers for our society’s appetite for […]

Pushing the boundaries – Epilogue

Over the past few weeks I’ve visited the four quadrants of the innovation landscape (the short series of posts started here) to get a better idea of the boundaries between the quadrants and how they are pushed. Now it’s time to zoom out again to take a look at the landscape as a whole, with […]

The bounds of the wicked quadrant …

Over the last few weeks, I’ve been roaming the innovation landscape to get a better view of the boundaries that divide the landscape into four quadrants. I started in the second quadrant (research) and through the third (disruptive), before I visited the first quadrant (business as usual). This short series is coming to an end in the most […]

Pushing the boundaries – Prologue

There are two distinct boundaries in the innovation landscape I have described in previous post (see the initial chart and the rules and tools). One boundary separates the known ideas from novel ideas. The other boundary divides the landscape into the areas of unknown problems on one side and unknown or unacknowledged problems on the other. Both are boundaries between […]

Innovation and revolution in science

A lot has been said already about the role of science as an essential underpinning of innovation. But apart from this perspective of innovation through science, there’s another aspect of the science-innovation relation I’d like to cast some light on: How does innovation in science work? The best point of departure for such a discussion, […]