On literacy

In the previous post, I’ve discussed some flaws in the way that we teach science, and I looked specifically into the effects that those simplified story lines of the science textbooks have on scientists themselves. However, scientists are only a small fraction of the population, and some basic science education is delivered to everybody. The […]

The subtle flaws of science education

In his landmark book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions Thomas Kuhn describes how the majority of scientific work is actually focused on solving scientific puzzles. That’s what Kuhn calls normal science, and scientists are perfectly trained for and highly efficient in pursuing this endeavour. But there are times when normal science reaches its limits, when anomalies […]

Innovation and revolution in science

A lot has been said already about the role of science as an essential underpinning of innovation. But apart from this perspective of innovation through science, there’s another aspect of the science-innovation relation I’d like to cast some light on: How does innovation in science work? The best point of departure for such a discussion, […]

Knowledge and the economy

Subtitle: Collaboration in innovation – A love-hate relationship Any endeavour that exceeds the skills and resources of an individual or that entails significant uncertainty and risk benefits from collaboration. At the same time, we have a very human inclination to share only the risk, while retaining the benefits for ourselves. This desire for selective sharing […]

Innovation & Science

Intuitively we know that science is somehow related to innovation. It is somewhere at the origin of innovation, isn’t it? Science underpins innovation, doesn’t it? But this relation is not as simple or straight as we might want it to be; there’s no self-evident direct connection. I’ve looked at this dilemma in an earlier post, […]