The Dunning-Kruger effect in innovation

One way or another, I’m sure you are all familiar with the Dunning-Kruger effect. You might have heard about it under the label of confident idiots, describing a behaviour of an unskilled individual being unaware of the lack of a specific skill, instead assuming to have a skill-level that is even superior to the experts in the field. […]

Innovation and revolution in science

A lot has been said already about the role of science as an essential underpinning of innovation. But apart from this perspective of innovation through science, there’s another aspect of the science-innovation relation I’d like to cast some light on: How does innovation in science work? The best point of departure for such a discussion, […]

Expectations and realities – part 2

In part 1 we thought about what we expect from innovation on one side, and how it evolves in reality on the other. It became pretty obvious that there is a significant mismatch between the facts about innovation and what we think them to be. In this second part now I’ll try to cast some […]

Expectations and realities – part 1

One of the biggest quandaries in innovation is the discrepancy between our hopes and desires on one side and the real outcomes on the other. No matter how well intended, carefully planned, or diligently executed a project, often the result does not match the expectations. What’s the reason for that? Now, you’ll find impressive volumes […]

The myth of unlimited capacity

Humanity has proved to be incredibly innovative in adjusting our living conditions to our advantage. This success story appears to predate written history, and one might draw the conclusion to our collective ingenuity was absolutely superior and capable of mastering any kind of problem. But is this really true?? Let’s think twice. Our track record […]